No Chinese citizen onboard aircraft crashed in Hawaii: Chinese Consulate General

Xinhua
The Chinese Consulate General in Los Angeles confirmed on Saturday that no Chinese citizen was onboard the aircraft which crashed in Hawaii on Friday night.
Xinhua

The Chinese Consulate General in Los Angeles confirmed on Saturday that no Chinese citizen was onboard the aircraft which crashed in Hawaii on Friday night.

The Hawaii Department of Transportation initially said first responders reported six deaths. The death toll rose to nine on Friday night and to 11 as of Saturday.

"The Chinese Consulate General in Los Angeles contacted local police department immediately after the crash. As far as we are informed, there is no Chinese citizen among the victims," the Consulate General told Xinhua.

In a risk warning for visiting Hawaii released last month, the Consulate General specifically mentioned outdoor safety risks such as air-diving and helicopter sightseeing, said the Consulate General, adding it recommended tourists participate those activities with caution.

According to the warning, four Chinese tourists died in the first five months this year in swimming or snorkeling in Hawaii.

The Consulate General called on Chinese tourists to be cautious while participating in water and outdoor activities, and be aware of natural disasters in Hawaii including hurricanes, tsunamis, volcanoes, earthquakes, floods and jungle fires.

The U.S. state of Hawaii is located in the jurisdiction of the Chinese Consulate General in Los Angeles. Chinese citizens who are seeking consular protection and assistance in the local area should contact the Chinese Consulate General in Los Angeles, according to the warning.

Friday's tragedy is one of the deadliest accidents for a civilian airplane in Hawaii's modern history. In 1992, nine people were killed when a tour aircraft crashed into mountainous terrain when it took off.

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